Firms in developing countries

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Firms in developing countries

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dc.contributor.author Hansen, Michael W. en_US
dc.contributor.author Schaumburg-Müller, Henrik en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-02-04T10:24:38Z
dc.date.available 2009-02-04T10:24:38Z
dc.date.issued 2007-12-06T00:00:00Z en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10398/6756
dc.description.abstract Business studies and development studies have evolved relatively independently of each other – business studies occupied with profit maximizing strategies and the activities of entrepreneurs, firms and value chains, and development studies with economic, social and political development strategies of countries and regions. However, as more and more of the world’s value-adding activities take place in developing countries and as MNCs increasingly incorporate developing countries’ markets and resources in their strategies, business studies has taken a growing interest in the particular conditions of local and foreign firms doing business in such environments. Simultaneously, as the limitations of state led development strategies have become apparent and as market ideology has become prevalent in a growing number of countries, development studies has directed growing attention towards the role of entrepreneurship, firm strategy, private sector development and foreign direct investment as vehicles for economic and social development. In other words, both fields approach business in development from different sides. This paper seeks to identify themes related to the firm in developing countries as taken up by both business and development studies. We suggest the themes of common interest and potential convergence to be those of market failures, institutions, entrepreneurship, clusters, and firm internationalization. The paper illustrates that there are substantial opportunities for cross-fertilization between the two bodies of academic enquiry, and indeed, that without a conversation between the two literatures in the era of globalization, the analytical and predictive power of both may be seriously impaired. en_US
dc.format.extent 32 s. en_US
dc.language eng en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Working paper;2007-5 en_US
dc.title Firms in developing countries en_US
dc.type wp en_US
dc.accessionstatus modt07dec06 nijemo en_US
dc.contributor.corporation Copenhagen Business School. CBS en_US
dc.contributor.department Institut for Interkulturel Kommunikation og Ledelse en_US
dc.contributor.departmentshort CBDS en_US
dc.contributor.departmentuk Department of Intercultural Communication and Management en_US
dc.contributor.departmentukshort ICM en_US
dc.idnumber x656555784 en_US
dc.publisher.city København en_US
dc.publisher.year 2007 en_US
dc.title.subtitle A theoretical probe into the borderland of Business Studies and Development Studies en_US


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