Expanding Policy Imagination in Political Economy

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Expanding Policy Imagination in Political Economy

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dc.contributor.author Seabrooke, Leonard en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-02-04T10:26:50Z
dc.date.available 2009-02-04T10:26:50Z
dc.date.issued 2006-12-21T00:00:00Z en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10398/7327
dc.description.abstract Much of the literature in political economy seeks to capture an essential insight into the evolution of political and economic systems to provide a foundation for policy advice. This article suggests that attempts to nut out the kernels of change often restrict rather than expand policy imagination. Three "fevers" are identified as involved in the narrowing of policy imagination and two "tonics" are offered to widen it. The three fevers are: 1. viewing the present as natural; 2. seeing history as overtly path dependent; and 3. viewing history as driven by "Great Men". These fevers limit our capacity to see political, social, and economic changes that do not conform to conventional theories, as well as distorting our understanding of how the contemporary world works. What policymakers want, more than prediction or recitation of conventional theories, is context to understand how policy can be implemented. Historical sociology provides a way to generate information about contextual constellations through two "tonics": intentional rationality and social mechanisms. With the assistance of these tonics, historical sociology widens political economy's policy imagination. en_US
dc.format.extent 21 s. en_US
dc.language eng en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Working paper;2006-036 en_US
dc.title Expanding Policy Imagination in Political Economy en_US
dc.type wp en_US
dc.accessionstatus modt06dec21 chlamo en_US
dc.contributor.corporation Copenhagen Business School. CBS en_US
dc.contributor.department International Center for Business and Politics en_US
dc.contributor.departmentshort DBP en_US
dc.contributor.departmentuk International Center for Business and Politics en_US
dc.contributor.departmentukshort CBP en_US
dc.idnumber x65653745x en_US
dc.publisher.city København en_US
dc.publisher.year 2006 en_US
dc.title.subtitle Three Fevers and Two Tonics from Historical Sociology en_US


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