Institutional Competitiveness in the Global Economy

OPEN ARCHIVE

Union Jack
Dannebrog

Institutional Competitiveness in the Global Economy

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Campbell, John L. en_US
dc.contributor.author Pedersen, Ove K. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-02-04T10:26:51Z
dc.date.available 2009-02-04T10:26:51Z
dc.date.issued 2006-01-02T00:00:00Z en_US
dc.identifier.isbn 8791690234 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10398/7329
dc.description.abstract Despite high taxes, a large state budget and welfare state, much economic regulation, and a very open economy, Denmark continues to compete successfully against the other advanced capitalist economies. Hence, Denmark presents a paradox for neoliberalism, which predicts that these policies will hurt national competitiveness under conditions of economic globalization. Following the varieties of capitalism literature, this paper argues that Denmark’s success has been based in large part on its institutional competitiveness–its capacity to achieve socioeconomic success as a result of the competitive advantages that firms derive from operating within a particular set of political and economic institutions. The institutional basis for successfully coordinating labor markets, vocational training and skill formation programs, and industrial policy are examined for Denmark and the United States—two countries that are very different institutionally. The analysis shows that there is no one best way to achieve success in today’s global economy, except perhaps for reducing socioeconomic inequality; that the type of capitalism known as coordinated market economies are oversimplified in the literature; and that high taxes, state spending, and economic regulation can actually enhance socioeconomic performance. en_US
dc.format.extent 33 s. en_US
dc.language eng en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Working paper;2005-021 en_US
dc.title Institutional Competitiveness in the Global Economy en_US
dc.type wp en_US
dc.accessionstatus modt06 en_US
dc.contributor.corporation Copenhagen Business School. CBS en_US
dc.contributor.department International Center for Business and Politics en_US
dc.contributor.departmentshort DBP en_US
dc.contributor.departmentuk International Center for Business and Politics en_US
dc.contributor.departmentukshort CBP en_US
dc.idnumber 8791690234 en_US
dc.publisher.city København en_US
dc.publisher.year 2005 en_US
dc.title.subtitle Denmark and the United States en_US


Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Files Size Format View
institutional_comp_21.pdf 245.7Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record