Strategy and Framework for Cultural and Nature Tourism in the Baltic Sea Region Countries

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Strategy and Framework for Cultural and Nature Tourism in the Baltic Sea Region Countries

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Title: Strategy and Framework for Cultural and Nature Tourism in the Baltic Sea Region Countries
Author: Lyck, Lise
Abstract: The long term tendencies for the EU economic development is not particular prosperous. The reason is found in the fact that both the GDP in the EU countries in relation to the world GDP as well as the size of the EU population in relation to the world population are decreasing. This implies relatively lower incomes in the EU and a change in the average age of the population with relatively more elderly people and an increased need for public services and a relatively smaller labor force. This long term development is also distinctive for the development in the Baltic Sea Region countries. The development implies that more export to the rest of the world as well as more tourists coming from the rest of the world to the EU should be on the main EU political agenda as well as on the agenda for the Baltic Sea countries. It is simply needed if the Baltic Sea Region countries shall continue to have an economic development with economic growth. The economic and financial crisis since September 2008 has deepened the problematic situation. It was seen in the press release after the G20 meeting in June 2012. Here, tourism was mentioned for the first time by the G20 countries and it was stressed that tourism development worldwide has to be given priority, as a policy to create jobs and to create economic growth as well as a recovery policy (WTTC, 2012). Tourism in this context includes transportation, shopping, attractions and events, accommodation and meals, i.e. all elements in leisure and business tourism. EU had already given more attention to tourism by including tourism in the Lisboan Treaty, approved during 2007 and ratified in 2008. Part One of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union provides that tourism falls within those actions designed to ‘support, coordinate or supplement the actions of the Member States’, i.e. within the EU’s powers to support the Member States (Article 6(d)). The new legal basis (Article 195, Part 3) develops this concept, by stipulating that the Union shall complement the action of the Member States in the tourism sector, in particular by promoting the competitiveness of Union undertakings. There is thus no standalone European policy on tourism; instead, the EU tries to encourage a favorable framework for economic development and facilitate cooperation between Member States in that area, through the exchange of good practices.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10398/8716
Date: 2013-06-10

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