D 10.1 - Mapping Flexibility and Security Performance in the Face of the Crisis

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D 10.1 - Mapping Flexibility and Security Performance in the Face of the Crisis

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Title: D 10.1 - Mapping Flexibility and Security Performance in the Face of the Crisis
Author: Eamets, Raul; Humal, Katrin; Beblavý, Miroslav; Maselli, Ilaria; Bheemaiah, Kariappa; Smith, Mark; Finn, Mairead; Leschke, Janine
Abstract: The term Flexicurity was a dominant theme at the European and national level in the first decade of this century and although its use has declined in recent years, the balance of flexibility and security for labour market participants remains a central factor in determining labour market outcomes – particularly for young people. The concept has, however, received a lot of criticism, often related to a lack of clarity in definition. On the one hand, the definitional ambiguity helps explains why the concept was picked up so easily at the policy level across a wide variety of stakeholders and contexts. But on the other hand, the ambiguity also explains how policies resulting in an overemphasis on (external) flexibility and employability, with little emphasis on job and income security, have developed. Thus the balance of flexibility and security remains a key dimension in understanding the plight of young people entering the labour market and the economic crisis has only served to further expose the uneven security afforded to different labour market groups. It is with this broader concept of “Flexicurity” – as the balance between flexibility and security on the labour market – that we approach the theme in this report. Youth tends to accumulate negative flexibility outcomes in that they have more limited contractual security, a greater risk of working on non-standard contracts and may lose their jobs more quickly than the comparable adult population. At the same time young people also have less job and income security due to their lower seniority and more limited employment histories. Furthermore in most European countries workers on non-standard contracts have more limited access to unemployment benefits than workers on standard employment contracts, which can exacerbate the position of vulnerable labour market groups often disproportionally engaged on such contracts – young people, women and people with lower education levels. The crisis further emphasised the risks of these negative outcomes.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10398/9405
Date: 2016-12-02

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